sex machine

sex machine

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Erectile Dysfunction May Signal Heart Disease

All facets of a guy's health can finally change his erectile function and skill to keep things going in the bedroom. Cardiovascular health, in particular, plays a great part in this regard. Guys that have reduced blood flow - whether due to decreased heart function itself or due to tempered or clogged arteries (a state called atherosclerosis) are exceptionally likely to develop erectile problems because of this. Moreover, poor heart health and diabetes are closely linked; patients who are being treated for morbidly high blood sugar are prone to nerve damage that disturbs the signals between the brain and organ that are needed to activate an erection.

From a mental health perspective, melancholy and stress have been linked to both heart disease and erectile dysfunction; treating psychological problems for example these can help restore satisfactory sexual function, too. Luckily for most guys, treating the underlying health problem can help fight loss of function. With additional focus to organ health, too, many guys can treat impotent problems and once again appreciate a wholesome and satisfactory sex life.

Can difficulties with getting an erection be an indication of another bigger issue that could cause you serious problems? Erectile dysfunction (ED) can be an indicator of underlying cardiovascular difficulties. It may be an early warning, in that respect.

The arrival of natural sexual energy conventions has put the spotlight back on ED, and a string of studies are indicating that, for most guys, the state has physical and not merely mental starts.

Early in 2004, researchers headed by Dr. Alan Bank of the St. Paul Heart Clinic in Minnesota released a study demonstrating that the arteries of men with ED grown less economically than men without erectile problems -- a potential indication of underlying heart disease.

It's possible for you to liken ED to a standard plumbing problem: If you turn in your kitchen faucet and you don't get any flow, either the faucet's broken or the pipes are clogged. For guys with advanced heart disease, the clogged-pipe explanation likely holds true, since accumulation of cholesterol in arteries can significantly reduce the flow of blood.

But many men with ED aren't anywhere near this phase of cardiovascular deterioration. For the men with ed, the faucet -- the vessels inside the member and the smooth muscle around them -- may be broken on a biochemical level.

As blood flow demands increase (as occurs during an erection), the endothelium releases nitric oxide to help cause blood vessel growth. Blood flow is essential for normal erectile function. It is also -- and here is the connection to heart disease -- quite significant as an anti-atherosclerotic agent, resisting hardening of the arteries.

In that sense, ED may function as an early indicate that blood vessels elsewhere in the body aren't growing as they should, either.